Drupal 8 Will Help You Save Time on the Next Drupal Upgrade

Nov 1, 2017 10:01:00 AM Jay

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The Drupal Upgrade Crisis is Over

Back in March 2017, Dries Buytaert, the creator of Drupal, published a blog post entitled "Making Drupal upgrades easy forever" in which he confirmed what we here at Ashday had already suspected: Drupal 8 has laid the groundwork for seamless upgrades to future Drupal versions. But what exactly does that mean, and what benefits could this have for your website?

The Dark Age of Upgrades

Prior to the release of Drupal 8, Drupal releases broadly followed a policy that included minor releases and major releases. Minor releases (such as upgrading from Drupal 7.18 to 7.19) were usually fairly simple updates. They would fix bugs, add in some small new features, and resolve security issues, but ultimately, it was rare for a minor update to cause any problems for a well-built Drupal site.

However, major releases (such as upgrading from Drupal 6 to 7) were a whole 'nother matter; they're basically different systems entirely.. Standard policy with major updates was that most anything that needed to be changed could be, even if doing so would make it impossible to seamlessly update a site from one version to the next. For instance, Drupal 6 included a feature by default that allowed each of a site's users to select what theme they saw the site in (changing the site's overall look and feel). In practice, not many sites made use of this feature, so it was removed in Drupal 7 so that developers could focus on the more frequently-used parts of Drupal. Of course, if a site used this feature, it couldn't be upgraded to Drupal 7 without either losing that functionality or having new development done to add a replacement. The Drupal way to make progress was to not tie the potential of the future to the decisions of the past.

What this has lead to, however, is that oftentimes, once a site has been built on one version of Drupal, it doesn't get upgraded to the next version without good reason. In fact, there are many sites still out there running on Drupal 6 simply because upgrading to Drupal 8 would be too expensive and time-intensive of a process.

Fortunately, the dark age of upgrades may be at an end.

Enter: Drupal 8

When Drupal 8 was released, the paradigm shifted. Drupal 8 is very different from Drupal 7 (even more so than 7 was from 6), and so upgrading a site to Drupal 8 presents many of the same difficulties as upgrades in the past. But, thanks to the hard work of the Drupal developers and everyone else involved in the project, future upgrades should be much simpler. Drupal 8's code has been written to make good use of web development standards in ways that past versions never even tried. Because of this, Drupal 8 is fundamentally a foundation that can be built on by future versions without needing a complete overhaul.

What that means is that any site which is kept up to date as minor releases come out should continue to work on Drupal 9 with minimal effort needed to upgrade it. Instead of everything changing at once like it did going from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8, old code and little-used features can be phased out slowly as better alternatives are developed and implemented.

And that leads us to the final result of this change of approach: Prior to Drupal 8, a site could be built and then be minimally maintained with security updates until the next version of Drupal came out, at which point it had to be rebuilt entirely. Now, a Drupal 8 site can be built, and if it is minimally maintained until Drupal 9, there might be a few adjustments needed to remove deprecated features, but there will certainly be fewer than in the old way. But what's more, if that Drupal 8 site is actively maintained, it may not even be using any deprecated features at all by the time Drupal 9 comes out, allowing that upgrade to be made with ease.

What Does This All Mean for You?

From a technical perspective, these are all great changes, but what does it actually mean for your website? Several things:

If you are on an older version of Drupal: Now is the time to upgrade. Upgrading from 6 is long overdue (it doesn't even get official security updates anymore!), but upgrading from 7 makes sense now as well. Before Drupal 8, it was common to skip versions… for instance, a Drupal 5 site would skip Drupal 6 entirely and get rebuilt on Drupal 7. But upgrading a Drupal 7 site to 9 shouldn't really be too different from upgrading it to 8… so, why wait? Upgrading now will help avoid any last-minute scrambling to update the site when Drupal 7 eventually stops getting security updates.

From a business and marketing standpoint, there's another hidden advantage as well. Before, redesigning a website often got tied to the need to upgrade Drupal. There wasn't much reason to do a big redesign, if you'd have to upgrade from one major release of Drupal to another just a year later, so the changes would get bundled together to avoid having to do two rebuilds. But what's more, taking on all the concerns of a site redesign alongside the technological challenges of a Drupal upgrade could make doing both at once a challenging task in itself.

Once your site is on Drupal 8, major releases should no longer require rebuilding the site… which frees up your Drupal developers to be able to do a redesign whenever it makes sense to from a branding or business perspective. Drupal 8 gives you the power to decide when a website overhaul should be done, rather than tying such upgrades to the technology the site happens to be built with.

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Topics: Drupal8, Drupal Upgrade, Drupal Migration